CNN Smriti Mundhra is not at all bothered that people are talking about colorism, sexism and elitism when it comes to “Indian Matchmaking. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. More Videos Why the Netflix show ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ is causing a stir She is the creator of the hit Netflix series that offers an inside look into the work of Sima Taparia, a Mumbai-based matchmaker who travels the world helping her client find their “life partners.

‘Indian Matchmaking’: The Dark Reality Behind Your Latest Netflix Binge

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In India, Don’t Hate the Matchmaker. A Netflix hit about arranged marriages reflects Indian society a lot more than critics want to admit. By. Shruti.

The second I saw Netflix’s Indian Matchmaking come up on my TV’s home screen, I excitedly texted a bunch of my Desi friends to see if they’d heard anything about it. I’m not saying that there weren’t any stereotypes that caught me off guard on the show like some of the character’s fake accents or the opening scene where Devi’s praying over a book for good grades , but there were some moments that really hit home for me in the coming-of-age comedy.

While I was excited to see something related to the Indian culture get the spotlight yet again, it sort of felt like a personal secret was about to be exposed to the world. I was a little worried how Indians would be portrayed, especially to people who aren’t familiar with a culture where arranged marriages are considered the norm. Would the show go into complexities and nuances that come with matchmaking? Being Indian , I’ve been asked about arranged marriages my entire life and have had to answer questions like, “Do you get to choose who you want to marry or do your parents choose for you?

Having been born in New Jersey but grew up in places like Dubai and Mumbai you can just call me Nikita Charuza From Mumbai , I know plenty of people who have had both arranged marriages and “love marriages. You sort of get lumped into one of those two buckets even though no two stories are the same. My parents had a “love marriage” and I was lucky enough that they supported my decision to marry whoever I wanted. At the same time, I also have friends and family members who had arranged marriages and you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference because of how happy they are.

Sima Taparia of ‘Indian Matchmaking’ on family dynamics, ghosting and failed matches

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I went in scornful. Like many of my progressive South Asian peers, I denounced arranged marriage as offensive and regressive. But when the matchmaker recited her lengthy questionnaire, I grasped, if just for a beat, why people did things this way. Do you believe in a higher power?

Indian Matchmaking, if nothing else, is an English reality TV show starring Indian people. It straddles two countries and cultures without missing a.

Sima Taparia is like a human Hinge algorithm. Card system, except instead of dueling, the players must get drinks with one another. Like all good bad reality dating shows such as recent Netflix hits Love Is Blind and Too Hot To Handle , the dates are largely cringey to watch, and there is ghosting, awkwardness, and family drama. Oh my! But the show has been met with equal parts fascination and criticism. While Indian Matchmaking carefully and successfully swats away stigmas that surround the concept of arranged marriage—that marriages are forced, or that individuals lack the freedom to make their own decisions— critics have highlighted that the show reinforces heteronormativity, divisions between social classes, and discrimination based on skin color, ethnicity, and status.

And while the series mostly opts to steer clear of those conversations, our concern for the mostly likable, relatable cast on their search for love runs deep. Times and OprahMag. Out now for the world to see! IndianMatchmaking is now streaming on netflix and what an absolute surreal feeling! Thank you to smritimundhra hoodle ferial83 and the rest of the team for being sooo great and making it easy for me to share my story and my family. Extra special thank you to simataparia for guiding me through this whole process.

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Critics accuse the show of stereotyping and commodifying women, lacking diversity and promoting a backwards vision of marriage where astrologers and meddling parents are more influential than the preferences of brides and grooms. They complain that the series, which follows matchmaker Sima Taparia as she jets between Mumbai and the U.

In fact, the real problem may be their discomfort with the way marriage works in India, with social stability prized over individual happiness. A small fraction still practices child marriage, with some communities holding betrothal ceremonies as soon as a girl is born.

On Indian Matchmaking, Mumbai-based Sima Taparia attempts to arrange marriages for a wide variety of young people living both in India and.

The Netflix hit “Indian Matchmaking” has stirred up conversations about issues like parental preference in marriage, cultural progress, casteism — and ghosting. Taparia answered questions via email from Mumbai, discussing why none of the matches worked out, her own arranged marriage and how business is booming despite the coronavirus pandemic. Sima Taparia: They are not separate things. Matchmaking is just a tool to help people find a life partner.

In India, the process also often involves parents. Has the show generated new interest in matchmaking with more people wanting to do it? Business is booming!

‘Indian Matchmaking’: Was Akshay’s Engagement Ceremony Fake?

It might seem strange to invoke an Alice Walker essay in connection with the new Netflix reality series, Indian Matchmaking , but, here we go. The essay is revolutionary for that coinage. Walker explicitly draws a connection between skin color and marriage.

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I was reporting a feature on India’s $​billion marriage-industrial complex — which includes.

Follow Us. Who was the mystery man and did the relationship eventually work out? We asked the New York-based physician herself. In an email interview, Rupam tells Vogue India that the couple got engaged during the lockdown and have been quarantining together ever since. So, on the recommendation of a friend, I downloaded the app two years ago when I was ready to date. Quite the contrary, in fact.

Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Is The Talk Of India — And Not In A Good Way

Indian Matchmaking is a Indian documentary television series produced by Smriti Mundhra. Indian Matchmaking was released on July 16, , on Netflix. Mundhra named the casting the biggest hurdle of the show, going through a client list of families and calling to see if they were willing to be on camera. Mundhra also noted that the series initially started with about a dozen singles but with some that “fell off” during production.

The show received mixed reviews between critics and social media users. In addition to showing ” classist ” and ” casteist ” stereotypes, the show was criticized for whitewashing the idea of arranged marriages.

That Indian Matchmaking has upset people across the spectrum is slightly baffling given we are a culture obsessed with arranged marriages.

Matchmaker Sima Taparia guides clients in the U. Sima meets three unlucky-in-love clients: a stubborn Houston lawyer, a picky Mumbai bachelor and a misunderstood Morris Plains, N. Friends and family get honest with Pradhyuman. Sima consults a face reader for clarity on her clients. A setback with Vinay temporarily discourages Nadia. Sima offers two more prospects to Aparna. Feeling the pressure, Pradhyuman finally goes on a date.

Nadia has a promising date. Pradhyuman sees a life coach. Sima sends Aparna to an astrologer and seeks a cultural match for guidance counselor Vyasar. A date with a model uplifts Pradhyuman. Vyasar and Rashi instantly bond. As Akshay rejects over 70 matches, Preeti gives him an ultimatum.

Why Does “Indian Matchmaking” Make My Culture Seem So Burdensome?

By Sajmun Sachdev August 11, But while I was celebrating what I found to be a super authentic look into the world of matchmaking, arranged marriages and Indian family dynamics, many reviewers and tweeters made me realize that I may be the only South Asian woman who was. So seeing that representation in Indian Matchmaking made me feel proud: Finally an Indian filmmaker had accomplished what we got into this industry to do: She put us on TV.

Indian Matchmaking could never be everything to everybody and still be the success it is.

Indian Matchmaking is another notch in Netflix’s reality-dating-show belt. A well-lit​, well-produced, empathetic docuseries, it follows matchmaker.

One of Netflix’s newest reality series Indian Matchmaking gives viewers a glimpse into the world of arranged marriages and Indian culture. Specifically, the show, which was filmed in , follows Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia and her partner-seeking clients as they navigate the tricky world of dating and compatibility. While the show has been met with notable criticism and sparked important conversations about colorism, casteism, and sexism, the series has quickly become a popular watch on the streaming service.

After seeing all eight episodes, many are left wondering what happened to the stars after the cameras stopped rolling. In case you’re curious, here’s an update on where each of Sima’s clients are today, and whether or not they’ve since found love after Indian Matchmaking :. One of the first individuals introduced on Indian Matchmaking , the Houston native appears to be living her best single life today.

While she was optimistic that things with Jay might go somewhere, she told Oprahmag. We’re good friends,” she told the publication about continuing to talk to three of her matches from the show.

Indian Matchmaking cast: Where are they now

Despite it focusing on a practice that could be seen as archaic and almost out of place in , it was a hit among people of all ages, backgrounds and nationalities. For those who had never heard of biodatas, star charts and the very concept of arranged marriage, it was maybe a morbid curiosity that got them deeply involved in the exploits of matchmaker Sima Taparia from Mumbai. The quest of its participants to find everlasting love amid the constraints of culture was played out for everyone to see, judge and make memes about.

But this is a reality that many young people face in India and other South Asian countries, where family comes first, second and third. So, does old school matchmaking still work?

The Netflix reality series Indian Matchmaking has been a viral hit, but mostly because people are talking about the controversies around it.

The Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia delivers this meme-friendly one-liner in the seventh episode of the hit Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. But she departs from this well-worn model in her attention to one extra characteristic: caste. This silent shadow hangs over every luxurious living room she leads viewers into. She lumps an entire social system, which assigns people to a fixed place in a hierarchy from birth, together with anodyne physical preferences.

This prejudiced treatment includes, but is hardly limited to, workplace discrimination in the United States. For example, the state of California sued the tech company Cisco in June for allegedly failing to protect a Dalit employee from discrimination by his higher-caste Brahmin managers. When a popular show like Indian Matchmaking neglects this alarming fact of the Indian American experience, it quietly normalizes caste for a global audience.

Contrary to what some viewers might think, the caste system is an active form of discrimination that persists in India and within the Indian American diaspora. One of the primary functions of arranged marriage is maintaining this status quo. That explains why people in dominant castes often carry out brutal violence against their own family members who dare to marry outside their caste, particularly if a partner is Dalit.

Last year, in Maharashtra, a father reportedly doused his daughter and her Dalit husband in kerosene and lit them on fire to condemn their intercaste marriage. These attacks are part of a pattern of families punishing relatives for rejecting marriages arranged on the basis of caste. Multiple episodes open with When Harry Met Sally —esque interviews featuring mostly older, straight couples in seemingly happy arranged marriages.

Same-sex marriages are not legally recognized in India.

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